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implied warranty in repairs

Laws vary from state to state, but the implied warranty of good and workmanlike repair of tangible goods or property attaches to a contract if the parties’ agreement does not provide for the quality of the services to be rendered or how such services are to be performed. And some courts have held that this implied warranty may not be waived or disclaimed.

Thus, the implied warranty of good and workmanlike repair or modification to tangible goods or property is a gap filler warranty that implies terms into a contract that fails to describe how the party or service is to perform. Although the parties cannot disclaim this warranty outright, an express warranty in their contract can fill the gaps covered by the implied warranty and supersede it if the express warranty specifically describes the manner, performance, or quality of the services.

The elements of a claim for breach of the implied warranty of good and workmanlike performance of services for the repair or modification of existing tangible goods or property are (1) the defendant sold services to the plaintiff; (2) the services involved the repair or modification of existing tangible goods or property; (3) the defendant failed to perform the services in a good and workmanlike manner; and (4) the defendant’s failure to perform the services in a good and workmanlike manner injured the plaintiff.

The term existing tangible goods refers generally to all moveable personal property other than money. The term repair means to restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken. The term “modification” broadly includes any change or alteration that introduces new elements into the details of the subject matter, or cancels some of them but leaves the general purpose and effect of the subject matter intact.

And the term good and workmanlike means that quality of work performed by one who has the knowledge, training, or experience necessary for the successful practice of a trade or occupation, and performed in a manner generally considered proficient by those capable of judging such work.

In Texas, the implied warranty of good and workmanlike repair of tangible goods or property is a legal concept that ensures services are performed to a certain standard when a contract does not specify the quality or manner of work. This warranty acts as a 'gap filler' for contracts that lack detailed descriptions of the service quality or performance expectations. It cannot be waived or disclaimed outright, but it can be superseded by an express warranty if the contract includes specific descriptions of the work to be done. To claim a breach of this implied warranty, a plaintiff must prove that the defendant sold services involving the repair or modification of existing tangible goods or property, failed to perform in a good and workmanlike manner, and that this failure caused injury to the plaintiff. 'Good and workmanlike' is defined as work that meets the standard of what is considered proficient by those with the knowledge, training, or experience in the relevant trade or occupation. The terms 'repair' and 'modification' refer to the restoration or alteration of movable personal property, respectively.


Texas Statutes & Rules

Federal Statutes & Rules

Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act - 15 U.S.C. §§ 2301 et seq.
This federal statute is relevant as it sets forth national standards for warranties on consumer products, which may include the implied warranty of workmanlike repair.

The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is a federal law that governs warranties on consumer products. While it primarily addresses written warranties, it also affects implied warranties, which are unwritten promises that arise from the nature of the transaction and the inherent understanding by the buyer rather than from the seller's express representations. Under the Act, implied warranties cannot be disclaimed if a written warranty is provided, and any attempt to disclaim or modify an implied warranty must be clear and conspicuous. The Act also provides that implied warranties may last as long as any written warranty provided. This law is particularly relevant to the implied warranty of good and workmanlike repair because it ensures that consumers receive the protection of implied warranties even when an express warranty is also in place.

Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) - Article 2
Although the UCC is not a federal statute but a model law, it has been adopted in some form by all 50 states and is relevant for the sale of goods and associated warranties, including the implied warranty of workmanlike service.

The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Article 2 deals with the sale of goods and includes provisions about implied warranties. While the UCC is not a federal law, it has been widely adopted by states and thus forms a uniform legal framework across the United States. Under the UCC, there are two key implied warranties: the warranty of merchantability and the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The warranty of merchantability is an assurance that the goods are fit for the ordinary purposes for which such goods are used. This could be interpreted to include the expectation of good and workmanlike repair or modification of goods. The UCC allows for the exclusion or modification of implied warranties, but such exclusions must be conspicuous and specific. The principles of the UCC regarding implied warranties are often applied by analogy to service contracts, although services are not goods and are generally not governed by Article 2.